$16.25

A. VOGEL Valerian

Valerian is used when stress levels are high. Allows to reach mental calmness and to quickly reach a deeply relaxed state. Natural herbal sedative.

Valerian is probably the most known of all calming herbs. It contains many active molecules including valepotriates, sesquiterpenes and a volatile oil containing bornyl derivatives. GABA and some GABA receptor lignans have also been identified. Many studies reached the conclusion that the whole Valerian extract is more effective than any of its individual parts.

Composition

Each 1 mL (36 drops) contains:

Medicinal ingredient:

Valeriana officinalis L. (Fresh Valerian*, root) 1X

Non-medicinal ingredient:

1 mL of tincture contains 0.56 mL alcohol (ethanol).

*Certified organically grown by: BIO SUISSE

1 mL = 36 drops. Dropper included.

Dosage

Adults and adolescents over 12 years old:
Take 10-30 drops on the tongue or with water, 1-3 times daily, 15 minutes before meals. Mix thoroughly with saliva and hold in the mouth for at least 1 minute before swallowing.
Children 2-12 years old:
Give 1 drop per year of age with water, 3 times daily, 15 minutes before meals.
Note:
In acute cases, take hourly up to 12 times daily, gradually reducing frequency as improvement occurs, or as directed by a healthcare practitioner. For chronic conditions, the full effect can only be felt after several days.

Actions and pharmacology

Valerian is probably the most known of all calming herbs. It contains many active molecules including valepotriates, sesquiterpenes and a volatile oil containing bornyl derivatives. GABA and some GABA receptor lignans have also been identified. Many studies reached the conclusion that the whole Valerian extract is more effective than any of its individual parts.


Known as a sedative and hypnotic, Valerian is effective against occasional insomnia and anxiety. It is also used for its antispasmodic effect and as supportive therapy for depression.


Valerian’s active ingredients are still the object of debates. In vivo, valepotriates reduce benzodiazepine weaning, link with GABA receptors, etc. Yet, valepotriates are very unstable and degrade under heat and in acid (like the stomach) or alkaline environments. It is however possible that they might act as pro-medications: their degradation products, baldrinal and homobaldrinal, might have some therapeutic effects.


Sesquiterpenes like valerinic acid and kessylglycol have demonstrated a sedative in vivo activity. Moreover, they increase GABA levels, a neurotransmitter with a calming effect on the nervous system.


Whatever its active ingredients, Valerian’s effects on nervousness, anxiety, insomnia and as an antispasmodic have now been proven.


The German Commission E acknowledges its benefits in cases of: restlessness, sleeping disorders based on nervous conditions